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life:

Audience members on opening night of the first-ever full-length 3D movie, 1952.
(Photo: J.R. Eyerman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Audience members on opening night of the first-ever full-length 3D movie, 1952.

(Photo: J.R. Eyerman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

stevenoble:

Warning & Cryptic shark deterrent wetsuits attempt to prevent shark attacks on simmers, surfers, and divers.
This image shows the “warning” version of a new shark deterrent wetsuit created by a research team in Australia after five people were killed off the western coast two years ago.
In response to this tragedy, two surfers decided that enough was enough. They spent the next few months pouring over the research and science of how ocean predators see and identify their prey. This is an excellent example of leveraging use cases and research to innovate.
They were able to analyze the data and put their findings to use designing what they believe are deterrents for sharks. They then took their concepts out into the water and gathered additional data with sharks in the wild comparing traditional wetsuits and their new wetsuit designs. Although they are not willing to say the suits are a guarantee to avoid attacks, all data seems to indicate that the new designs do in fact deter sharks.
We can learn a few lessons from this:
1. If you are passionate enough about something, you can make it happen.
2. Proper data collection and analysis can lead to innovative solutions.
3. Concept testing is critically important. (I don’t think anyone would be willing to bet their life on a wetsuit that had never been tested, would you?)
4. Know your customers needs. (Would you be willing to pay a little more for a wetsuit if there was even a small chance that it actually deterred sharks?)
This is a great story of how innovations don’t always come from blue sky invention. Identifying and finding ways to satisfy customer needs can yield amazing innovations.

stevenoble:

Warning & Cryptic shark deterrent wetsuits attempt to prevent shark attacks on simmers, surfers, and divers.

This image shows the “warning” version of a new shark deterrent wetsuit created by a research team in Australia after five people were killed off the western coast two years ago.

In response to this tragedy, two surfers decided that enough was enough. They spent the next few months pouring over the research and science of how ocean predators see and identify their prey. This is an excellent example of leveraging use cases and research to innovate.

They were able to analyze the data and put their findings to use designing what they believe are deterrents for sharks. They then took their concepts out into the water and gathered additional data with sharks in the wild comparing traditional wetsuits and their new wetsuit designs. Although they are not willing to say the suits are a guarantee to avoid attacks, all data seems to indicate that the new designs do in fact deter sharks.

We can learn a few lessons from this:

1. If you are passionate enough about something, you can make it happen.

2. Proper data collection and analysis can lead to innovative solutions.

3. Concept testing is critically important. (I don’t think anyone would be willing to bet their life on a wetsuit that had never been tested, would you?)

4. Know your customers needs. (Would you be willing to pay a little more for a wetsuit if there was even a small chance that it actually deterred sharks?)

This is a great story of how innovations don’t always come from blue sky invention. Identifying and finding ways to satisfy customer needs can yield amazing innovations.

eventjoeproject:

Tile, the world’s largest
lost and found.

Locate anything with Tile. It has never been easier to find your keys

67 Ways to Become Your Company’s Top Engineer.
  1. Get enough sleep.
  2. Eat properly.
  3. Prepare for meetings.
  4. Take careful notes.
  5. Jump after site experience.
  6. Show up early.
  7. Leave late.
  8. Take courses.
  9. Read books.
  10. Listen to audiobooks.
  11. Choose your attitude.
  12. Learn how to craft an email.
  13. Check your spelling.
  14. Get certified as a professional engineer.
  15. Get another degree.
  16. Go to conferences.
  17. Be pleasant.
  18. Ask smart questions.
  19. Don’t use acronyms unless you know for a fact that everyone in the room knows what you’re talking about.
  20. Listen actively.
  21. Use a Moleskine.
  22. Keep a to do list.
  23. Keep your calendar up to date.
  24. Eat That Frog!
  25. Find a mentor.
  26. Mentor someone else.
  27. Volunteer.
  28. Read trade magazines.
  29. Have a vision for your future self.
  30. Focus on the task at hand.
  31. Catch up with your boss after anything off site.
  32. Say what you mean and mean what you say.
  33. Show up.
  34. Do the social stuff after hours.
  35. Become a recognized expert in your field.
  36. Participate in meetings.
  37. Hold short meetings.
  38. Use an agenda when you host a meeting.
  39. Build your day around routines.
  40. Be responsive to communication.
  41. Dress the part – for the office and the field.
  42. Develop your leadership skills.
  43. Learn to use your tools and software better than anyone else.
  44. Don’t gossip about others.
  45. Give credit where credit is due.
  46. Make public safety an absolute priority over everything else. Always.
  47. Take the safety rules seriously when on site.
  48. Respect other people’s time.
  49. Learn to ask pointed questions tactfully.
  50. Be honest about what you know and what you don’t.
  51. Be a perpetual student of your field. You’re never done learning.
  52. Put first things first.
  53. Adopt a win-win mentality. Better to walk away from a deal than to have the other party lose.
  54. If it takes less than three minutes, do it now.
  55. Learn to take criticism.
  56. Have someone review your work.
  57. Treat everything like its your life’s work.
  58. Learn from your mistakes – heck, write them down in your own personal lessons learned document.
  59. Have a personal mission statement, and live by it.
  60. Find heroes to model your life after – the world of engineering is full of them.
  61. Do the work that no one else will do.
  62. Let people know where you are.
  63. Find a way to do things better.
  64. Don’t settle for “This is how we’ve always done it”.
  65. Know your company’s policies and procedures like the back of your hand.
  66. Make other people look good.
  67. Don’t speak just for the sake of being heard.

Source

(via engineeron)

nae-design:

Vivi Feng & Yu-Ping Chuang created BANDiful, a single-hand to application bandage.

stanfordbusiness:

Innovation is key to surviving in today’s fast-changing markets. Read how giving all employees an equal opportunity to pitch new ideas can inspire creativity in the workplace: http://stnfd.biz/n9Dl8 

stanfordbusiness:

Innovation is key to surviving in today’s fast-changing markets. Read how giving all employees an equal opportunity to pitch new ideas can inspire creativity in the workplace: http://stnfd.biz/n9Dl8 

quiet-design:

Dustpan designed by Jan Kochański

quiet-design:

Dustpan designed by Jan Kochański